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The Joys of HAMPTON

Like the city's  famous Algernoune Oak, almost 5 centuries old, Hampton's been around for a long, long time. Our history is fascinating, but that's not all we've got! Hampton transports visitors from the sea to the stars. Community gardeners will discover a bountiful harvest of history, food, and fun in our host city, lovely, lively, and historic Hampton, Virginia.

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Historic Fort Monroe National Monument is best known as the site of the 1619 first landing of people from Africa in the English Colonies that became America.  Eloa Lewis Dance, Acting Superintendent, and her staff will welcome you and show you around. Fort Monroe was recently named a "Site of Memory" by the United Nations. (LEARN MORE...)

Downtown Hampton is known for fun and charm, with lively music and the charming historic Phoebus neighborhood. People know how to have fun safely, with lots of outdoor options. (LEARN MORE...)

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YES! There's plenty of beach space in the open air at Buckroe Beach Park and the other beaches near Hampton. Whether you just want to kick back or have some fun playing in the waves and sand, Hampton delivers! (LEARN MORE...)

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Chesapeake Bay is an ecological treasure, with possibilities for birding, paddling, and exploring the fascinating interactions of sea, fresh water, and land. Gardeners take our inspiration from nature, and it doesn't get better than this! (LEARN MORE...)

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You are looking at a zucchini growing in space, at the International Space Station. NASA's Langley Center in Hampton is fascinating, but bet you didn't think you'd learn about out-of-this-world veggies! (LEARN MORE...)

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Maybe the best thing of all about Hampton is the people. Community gardeners will be welcomed by the gardeners of Hampton, who are working hard to make sure the ACGA conference is a success. A local artist has even joined the efforts. (LEARN MORE...)

Dreaming of a comfortable, cozy place to relax, gaze at the sea, and let warm sand and gentle waves tickle your toes? In Hampton, you'll enjoy access to several beaches, including a state park.

 

Maybe you’re a history buff, and want to explore Hampton's rich multicultural history, from First Nations peoples, to early English colonists, to the first Africans ever to land in America in 1619 (Fort Monroe National Monument inside Hampton's city limits commemorates the spot.) Hampton boasts a number of museums, and its Phoebus neighborhood, perfect for wandering, is a national historical district with a 400-year history.

 

Perhaps your eyes are on the stars and you dream of what it’s like to be hurled into space. NASA is located in Hampton, with displays and information (NASA has even worked on growing food in space - talk about out-of-this-world veggies!)

 

Everyone knows that gardeners love the environment and growing plants. Hampton is located on the Chesapeake Bay, an ecological treasure. Plus, there are active community gardens and farmers' markets that show what you can grow when you dig in rich soil.

 

How about music and dancing? ACGA conferences (and members) are known for their dancing feet! Downtown Hampton is a lively venue that provides a setting for live music, plus dining here is just as amazing and diverse as our city, from seafood to Asian to down home Southern goodness!

 

Hampton is waiting to welcome ACGA and ready to load conference attendees up with some of the best memories ever! You may be coming for a conference, but we guarantee you'll have such a great time that you’ll be back to visit us in Hampton again and again.

A gardener's note: We gardeners love trees, and Hampton is home to specimens that will leave you in silent and respectful awe. In addition to the Algernourne Oak, already a mature tree when it bore witness to the first Africans to arrive in Virginia in 1619, there's also the Emancipation Oak on the Hampton University campus, where the Emancipation Proclamation was first read aloud to people held in bondage in the South. Learn more in Two Hampton trees by Rex Springston in the Virginia Mercury (and support local journalism.) (Special thanks to Cynthia Harris and Wendy Iles for indispensable assistance in creating this section.)

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